Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

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Capellanus
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Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by Capellanus »

Dose anyone have a link to information about the current program at JSOMTC?

I was wondering what training our Ranger medics go through today prior to being assigned to BN.
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MagNeato
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Post by MagNeato »

I completed the SOCM course a few months ago. There is little to no information regarding the course that i was ever able to find on the internet other than just general common sense info.

I will say that all Ranger medics complete both the regular 68w medic course and SOCM and there is really no comparison. I get asked a lot in 2nd Batt what the course is like by the 11Bs and the best way i can describe it is by saying that regular medics are comparable to infantry AIT in terms of level of skill and SOCM grads are comparable to an 11B that has been in Batt a while. That is the extent of the difference in terms of knowledge and treatment capabilities / options etc. and definatly a HUGE amount of patient contact compared to regular medics.

Hope this helps, if you are looking for something more specific feel free to hit me up!
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Leatherneck
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Post by Leatherneck »

MagNeato wrote:I will say that all Ranger medics complete both the regular 68w medic course and SOCM and there is really no comparison. I get asked a lot in 2nd Batt what the course is like by the 11Bs and the best way i can describe it is by saying that regular medics are comparable to infantry AIT in terms of level of skill and SOCM grads are comparable to an 11B that has been in Batt a while. That is the extent of the difference in terms of knowledge and treatment capabilities / options etc. and definatly a HUGE amount of patient contact compared to regular medics.
Is there not a difference in terms of the scope of surgical interventions available to the SOCM medic as opposed to the 68W? Do 68Ws drop chest tubes? I didn't think so but I didn't go to that course.
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Post by PocketKings »

viewtopic.php?t=31186&highlight=socm

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Post by Leatherneck »

Yeah, confirmed this today. As a 68W you should not be performing surgical interventions available to the SOCM medic such as chest tubes, surgical crics, and cutdowns. This is to say nothing of the extent of the training in A&P, the PEPP/PALS blocks, ACLS, and the rest.

In my class the 68Ws had a lower pass rate than the 11Bs. That says a lot about the extent of 68W training IMHO.
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colin1
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by colin1 »

Hello everyone I was just wondering if there was anyone who would be willing to PM me and tell me a bit about SOCM? I want to get a 68W with an option 40 contract next spring and am curious as the what the course consists of. As stated in earlier posts the internet doesn't contain much more than common sense information about the course. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
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cback0220
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by cback0220 »

Go ahead and PM me with your questions.
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by RngrDoc75 »

Here is the official course description. More info can be found on the Ranger Medic Recruiting sticky in the Medical Forum.

Special Operations Combat Medic Course (300-F8)


1. MEDICAL FUNDAMENTALS
Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology, Medical Terminology, Medical Documentation, Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical calculations, and Basic Physical Examination Techniques

2. TRAUMA MANAGEMENT
Trauma Patient Assessment, Basic & Advanced Airway Management, Patient Management Skills, Pre-Hospital Trauma Emergencies & Care, Tactical Combat Casualty Care, Operating Room Procedures, Minor Surgical Skills, and NREMT-Basic Examination.

3. EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Medical Patient Assessment, Pediatric Emergencies, Obstetrics & Gynecology Emergencies, Medical Patient Emergencies, Emergency Cardiac Care & Cardiac Pharmacology, and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Tactical Medical Emergencies Protocols.

4. PARAMEDIC FIELD INTERNSHIP & CLINICAL ROTATION
2-Week Hospital Rotation – Emergency department, labor & delivery, surgical intensive care, pediatric emergency department, and operating room.
2-Week Ambulance Rotation - assignment to an Advanced Life Support EMS unit responsible for responding to a variety of 911 emergency calls.

5. EXAMINATION
USSOCOM EMT-Paramedic (EMT-P) and Advanced Tactical Practitioner (ATP) Examination

6. MILITARY MEDICINE
Care of the Trauma Patient in a Field Environment, Combat Trauma Management (CTM), Preventive Medicine, Nuclear, Biological & Chemical Casualty Care, Nursing Care, 30 hours of Clinical Sick Call rotation under medical officer supervision.

GRADUATION:
Certification as a USSOCOM-State Paramedic
Certification as a USSOCOM-State Advanced Tactical Practitioner
Certification as a National Registry EMT-Basic
Ability to challenge the National Registry EMT-Paramedic Examination
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if you can do the math and have been in the Regt medical team in those years, then you probably know who I am...

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Rangertom
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by Rangertom »

There are a couple of books you could brush up on.
The Brady paramedic books through paramedic level. You now earn a USSOCOM paramedic certificate. For all intensive purposes USSOCOM is a 51st state in the DOT system.
Any anatomy books ie Grey’s anatomy.
I saw a book called ‘Emergency War Surgery’ in clothing in sale last night it cover a lot of the advanced procedure and then some.
I think the other one was called ‘Field Surgery’ or something like that.
There is also a book that is pretty much a copy of the 18D hand book put out by I think Citadel Publishing You will find it in Barns & Noble medical section ‘Spec ops. Med. Hand book’ or something similar.
Basically books that covers: Chest tubes, venous cut downs, sutures, drug dosages, crikes, etc. (in common terms)
If you know your anatomy and basic Paramedic stuff you will be way ahead of the game. Get ready to study A LOT.
528 medics are also authorized and as of 2 years ago LRS is MTOEd SOCM medics.
Did they finely change it so the ranger medics go through the SOCM course before going to BN?

Some of you might be looking for info about training aids that can not be put out for OPSEC reasons. Please watch any PETA type issues.
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by RngrDoc75 »

REPLICATED FROM THE MEDICAL ISSUES FORUM....THIS IS THE OFFICIAL RANGER MEDIC TRAINING PIPELINE



Just because I have seen queries on here in the past, I will post the official response.

Ranger Medics are MOS 68W personnel with the ASI “W1” and SQI of “P” or “V”, so a medic in the Regiment holds either MOS 68W1PW1 or 68W1VW1 (the 4th digit number designated by rank/skill level). (68W is the Army MOS formerly known as 91B)

Ranger Medics are recruited from 68W AIT and the Army abroad. Generally, skill level 1 (E1-E4) are recruited at Ft Sam Houston and E5 and above from the Army abroad. Both require Ranger Medic Application Packets. Application packets can be downloaded from the official Regt website at: https://www.infantry.army.mil/75thrange" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... /index.htm (at the bottom of the website). The vast majority of Ranger Medics are recruited at AIT as privates and grow to be NCOs in the unit. On the other hand, there have many Big Army recruited medics that have been very successful in the Regiment.

Ranger Medics attend the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program either through the Ranger Indoctrination Program (RIP) or the Ranger Orientation Program (ROP) depending on their rank level. SGT and below attend RIP and SGT(P) and above attend ROP.
Upon completion of RIP, a skill level 1 medic attends the Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) course at the Joint Special Operations Medical Training Center (JSOMTC) at Fort Bragg, NC. Incoming NCO Medics attend RIP or ROP, then Pre-Ranger, Ranger School and then the SOCM course. No medic is assigned to the Regiment without completing the SOCM course. SOCM is a 6-month course taught at Paramedic level with a heavy focus on trauma and military medicine. SOCM is the first half of the 18D SFMS course and is required for all medics assigned to USASOC units. Currently, SOCM graduates are certified as a USSOCOM State Advanced Tactical Practitioner (ATP). There are initiatives in the works to change the certification back to NREMT-Paramedic and/or a State certified Paramedic. Regardless, SOCM medics are trained at and above the DOT Paramedic standard. Ranger Medics owe the Regiment 2 years after SOCM graduation (unless otherwise decided by the Regt - i.e. the good old RFS).

Ranger Medics are Rangers just like every other Ranger and undergo all of the training inherent to the mission of Ranger units. Medics are organic to Ranger companies and platoons and go with and do everything that the platoon does (training and combat). The Ranger Medic is on virtually every mission a Ranger unit undertakes as an assault force asset until he needs to perform his duties as a medic. Medics attend Ranger school just like everybody else based off of order of merit in the unit. Most medics have the opportunity to attend Ranger school within their first 12 months in the unit (just like everybody else). If a medic does not go to Ranger school in those first 12 months, then it is probably because of himself not being ready to go physically and mentally.

Ranger Medic sustainment training is encompassed in a unit-regulated requirements-based training plan. Prior to every deployment, a medic must complete Ranger Medic Assessment & Validation (RMAV) which is divided into 4 components: Written Test on pharmacology and protocols, skill stations on key procedures, scenario/simulator-based objective evaluation and finally an oral board with the unit medical director (Battalion Surgeon). Medics attend the Special Operations Combat Medic Skills Sustainment Course (SOCMSSC) every 2 years to maintain ATP certifications as well as PHTLS, ACLS, TCCC, and PALS/PEPP. Medics attend a Combat Trauma Management (CTM) training block annually to enhance specific skills and joint interoperability with other SOF units. Every 2-3 years, Ranger Medics attend a trauma center rotation for a month at a major metropolitan trauma center (Currently, Grady Hospital in Atlanta). Monthly, medics attend classes instructed by unit medical officers on trauma management, tactical medical emergency protocols, and sick call management.

Ranger Medics conduct sick call for their Rangers as Rangers do not go to an Army TMC unless coordinated by the unit for specific requirements such as labs or xrays. Part of being a Ranger Medic is taking care of our Rangers every single day and knowing the pertinent medical history of every Ranger in the platoon. This also covers the medical readiness of assigned Rangers through the SRP program (immunizations, etc…). The most important weapon system in the unit is the Ranger and he must be maintained better than any piece of equipment. The basic methodology of support is to have a healthy Ranger to assault a target, keep him healthy while on target, and bring a healthy Ranger home.

Ranger Medics are also the primary instructors for medical training within the Regiment. The primary course for every Ranger in the Regt is the Ranger First Responder (RFR) course. This is the Ranger version of Combat Lifesaver (which, by the way, is based on RFR). Rangers receive RFR refresher training annually and the Ranger Medic teaches all of those classes.

There are also a handful of enlisted medical support positions in the Regt for MOS 68J (Med Logistics), 68S (Preventive Medicine), and 68X (Mental Health Spec).

Each unit in the Regiment is authorized a variety of medical officers. Medical officer specialties include physicians (61N, 62B, 61H, and 62H), physician assistants (65D), physical therapists (65A), and medical service corps (70B and 70H). Medical officers may apply for assignment at the same website above. Medical officers attend the ROP course and are eligible to attend Ranger school just like everybody else.

Most Ranger Medics leave the unit to be bigger and better individuals. In the last 15 years, 24 medics have become physicians, 49 physician assistants, and many are working as licensed medical professionals in or out of the Army. Very few go to special forces or to the Big Army.

For those interested in the Ranger Medic Handbook, it can be purchased from North American Rescue Products at the following website: http://www.narescue.com/Ranger-Medic-Ha" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... 3C144.aspx. All proceeds are donated to the Wounded Warrior Foundations. The cost is $30 but keep in mind we are supporting our wounded brothers and families through this cause. The Regiment purchases issued handbooks from the same vendor as it is actually cheaper than using the installation publications center. Any electronic versions out there should be considered bootleg pirated copies and are not the official handbook. These electronic copies are also not the finished product as it was a draft version that got out on the internet before the handbook was finished. The Handbook was copyrighted by a civilian publisher as it was a 50/50 military and civilian authored publication.

The basic tenant of medical care in the Regiment is based on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC). The Regiment was the first military organization to tailor unit medical training on TCCC over 10 years ago. The Regiment has also maintained voting membership on the DOD Committee for Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) since its inception.

Application packets for all medical positions can be downloaded from the Ranger Medic AKO page: https://www.us.army.mil/suite/page/136399" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
This page also includes the recruiting brief, current TCCC information, RFR Course files, as well as significant trauma medical literature.

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RngrDoc75
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1990-1995 at 1/75
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2012 to 2015 at USSOCOM
2015 to Present CoTCCC/Joint Trauma System

if you can do the math and have been in the Regt medical team in those years, then you probably know who I am...

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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by fritzscorner »

I hope I'm not going out of my lane here Rangers.

Some info for any future 68w option 40 soldiers (would have to be done during spare time in AIT), any current 68W thinking about going Ranger, or just any 68W looking to increase there knowledge in there field.

There is a correspondence course "081-18D SOCM PREP" I believe is the name on ATRRS. Its meant to orientate medics with SOCM before actually attending the course.

You register for the course on ATRRS self development catalogue to receive credit. You cant just do it on ATIA website like many other correspondence courses.

Search the ATRRS self development course catalogue under the Medical branch code "555" I believe it is. You will find the course there.

Once you register for the class, AMEDD non-resident branch will enroll you and make the content viewable on the ALMS website. (this may take awhile...)

If you are deployed I strongly suggest spending time downloading the course lessons from ATIA website. You can find the subcourses there but not the actual course itself.

It may take awhile, but its worth it in the long run. Waiting random amounts of time for the ALMS website to launch the material because the shitty Internet speeds downrange is a pain. When you can have the material and studying already.

AMEDD will also send you test booklets via mail, but tests can also be taken on the ALMS website.

AND DON'T CHEAT :wink:

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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by RngrDoc75 »

Fritz is correct about the correspondence course. This is the official USAJFKSWCS approved prep course. However, it does have some typos/mistakes/flaws that can cause some confusion down the road. This course only help you prep for about the first 6 weeks of the 6-month SOCM course. Any correspondence course completion is also good for promotion points.

The correspondence course is fine for medics who are currently assigned to other units and are applying for a Ranger Medic assignment. 68W AIT students should concentrate on doing good at AIT and not get distracted. Additionally, medics coming from Ft Sam through ABN through RIP will undergo Pre-SOCM training after RIP. Some of the materials from this correspondence course is used in Pre-SOCM along with 4 other textbooks. The Regiment's Pre-SOCM training has changed a lot in the last 6 months and is now a pass/fail course prior to attending SOCM for initial entry medics.
RngrDoc75
Ranger Medic, 75th RGR Regt
1990-1995 at 1/75
1995 to 2012 at RHQ
2012 to 2015 at USSOCOM
2015 to Present CoTCCC/Joint Trauma System

if you can do the math and have been in the Regt medical team in those years, then you probably know who I am...

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"Mastery in Close Combat Medicine"

panthersix
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by panthersix »

RngrDoc75 wrote: The Regiment's Pre-SOCM training has changed a lot in the last 6 months and is now a pass/fail course prior to attending SOCM for initial entry medics.
And if you fail, then you go to the Pre-SO Cooking Course! :lol:
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dcal7
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by dcal7 »

Rangers,

I wanted to thank all the Rangers for providing the information that they have provided. Particularly Ranger RngrDoc75 as I am currently searching for an Option 40 68w and the information he has provided on this thread has been incredibly helpful.

Thank You,

Doug

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Nugget
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Re: Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) Course

Post by Nugget »

Here's a link to an article about the training at the JSOMTC.

http://www.soc.mil/swcs/swmag/Page1.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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