Long overdue SITREP

Commo from our members who are in OSUT, Jump School, RIP, Ranger School, etc.
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PAhunter21
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Joined: June 8th, 2011, 12:23 pm

Long overdue SITREP

Post by PAhunter21 »

OSUT
Well, I guess I'll actually start with 30th since, we'll, that's where everyone starts. After a long journey you pull up on the bus, equal parts nervous and pumped, not sure what to expect. I'm ready to go, almost hoping for a smoking just to get rid of 12 hours of flying's worth of pent up piss n vinegar. I see the brown round coming and I'm so ready to go I can hardly stand it. He steps on the bus and all I can think is "here we go!".......and what follows is the most painfully boring, frustrating, purgatory of an experience I've run into in my 23 years. Reception...is.. the.. fucking... worst. From standing in endless lines to be given gear by tired, often rude, civilians, to dealing with the endless dick measuring and moronic comments of my fellow privates, 30th AG was the worst 16 days of my life. You'll hear people say how thankful you should be to be there where you can eat the food you want and you can't be smoked. Bullshit.

All good things must come to an end and soon we're getting smoked in the bay in our new home sweet home. OSUT really is what you make it. You get caught up in the bs and how unfair this is or how much that sucked and your in for a long few months. Learn what you can, get in the best shape you can, and always remember that team work makes the dream work. Working with some of the guys in my platoon was nothing short of infuriating at times. Being older then most of the guys and having high hopes of earning a slot to airborne and rasp, some of the immaturity and laziness got to me and made working with my platoonmates difficult at times. Being the PG of a bunch of 18 year olds who think OSUT is the pinnacle of baddassness can be pretty terrible. Thankfully, I made a few good friends with similar goals and we pulled each other through it. We had to pour a lot of water on a lot of sleeping mother fuckers to get us through FTX.

I got offered my contract during a field exersicise. DS called a few of the guys in our company in to the center of the AO and asked if we knew what an option 40 was. I about shit myself despite copious amounts of MRE cheese in my system. I couldn't get my pen out fast enough to sign that paper. I don't know how often this happens but I know someone was looking out for me.

In the end though, I think OSUT made me a better team player. Playing team sports in high school and college is just not the same. It's a part time thing. I back the dude up on the field, cover his zone, finish his tackle and then shower and say "cya at practice" and he's no longer my problem or responsibility. Not the case anymore. Everything from what your buddies eat, to how they make their bunk, to how their mom is doing is your problem and can directly affect your day to day. You're a team, it's a bitch sometimes, but it's the truth. Learn to love it because team work will only become more important in RASP and at your unit.

Airborne:
3 weeks of Army gayness with a few of the most adrenaline filled moments of my life so far thrown in. From the green light, to when I hit the ground 5 times, awesome. Problem is that's about .23 percent of airborne school. Mostly it's sitting in uncomfortable harnesses in uncomfortable weather but it's a rite of passage and it's a breather to prepare for what's to come. I think other than the jumps the thing I like the most was the history of airborne school. I had read a lot about it and a lot of novels and memoirs of Rangers and others who went through this school and I really enjoyed identifying landmarks and events I had read about.

I guess as far as advice I can give don't worry about the technical aspects of airborne they will be drilled into your head until they're second nature. Don't let your new taste of freedom get to your head. You'll get weekends off. I even had a three day. Do not be stupid. Also, I would never have thought I would need to say this until I saw it, but don't quit already. Probably 20 guys in my airborne class dropped their option 40 or 18x during ground week and they were dropped from airborne school on the spot. Good fucking riddance.

Pre-RASP
Thankfully, I only had a week of pre-RASP hold before RASP. Some guys I classed up with had been there for up to two months, poor bastards. You get your gear for RASP, take some classes on Ranger history, and do some pretty good PT. If I ever needed motivation I could just look over at the post RASP guys in their berets and I knew I was gonna be there some day. In conclusion, the pros of pre-RASP are the pt and the chance to get a head start on the academic side of things. Cons: nasty barracks and taking a bus to every meal gets old pretty swiftly.

RASP
I can't remember where I heard this but I couldn't agree more. "RASP is what you thought basic would be like. Just like being a Ranger is what you thought you would be doing when you joined the Army." I thought basic would test me physically and mentally before I got there and was kind of let down by the experience. Well, RASP gave me all I could handle in those departments. I did more pt, shot more rounds, and all around learned more in those 8 weeks then all of my military career up to that point. The cadre are the epitome of of professionalism and some the best men I've ever met. Of course, that's my opinion looking back on it. At the time, those dudes crushed my nuts. I learned a lot from those men. The blocks of instruction were well done and the informal classes they took the iniative to put on were awesome. Land navigation, marksmanship, mobility, battle drills, pt, rucking, fast roping, and stealth. All topics that were covered expertly by the cadre either in their own in the evening while they had to check in because they were on staff duty or because it was a planned block of instruction. Either way, through the smokings, the hitting the woodline, and the endless writing of The Ranger Creed,the fact that the cadre cared about us and the level of our training before they sent us off to their beloved battalions was evident. Needless to say, I have tremendous respect for those men.

The Georgia July heat definitely affected my class. We had as many kids go down with heat casualties as quit I bet. Almost every event,from rucks to land nav at Cole Range, produced a few quitters and as many kids passed out in the woods somewhere. If your reading this before you head to RASP drink water for Christ's sake. Hydration is more than that though. Eat right, drink the nasty tasting Cera sport things they give you. (those things taste like death but they are money) Take care of yourself and listen to what your body is telling you. Push yourself by all means, it's actually not really an option, but when you see white spots or feel dizzy it's time to make your body a priority. Don't quit, don't use it as an excuse, don't drop from the event, but do what you can to take care of yourself. Better yet, do all you can BEFORE the event to prepare. If your not getting up to piss at least once the night before the 12 mile when it's gonna be 97 degrees your doing it wrong. You have a better chance of making it to Regiment if you were a little slower on the 12 mile because you stopped to dunk your arms in the coolers they put out and have a drink then if you stumble off the road, pass out with heat stroke, and get a thermometer up your ass because you went down as a heat casualty.

All in all, I learned a lot during those weeks. About myself and about how to be a Ranger. It's one of those experiences you look back on almost fondly because you know how much you grew and improved as a man. ( but only from a safe distance and after being assured you would never have to do it again.) If your looking for advice I could probably boil it down to this: look out for your buddies, dont fuck up on the weekends, drink water, and of course don't quit.

Regiment

NOW you start for real. From my first day it was clear that this is the real deal. Your not in school, mistakes are serious, attitude is everything. It can be rough at times, being the new guy, but it's worth it. Shit, I'm still a new guy but I go to work with more motivation every day then I used to think was possible at 5am. I learn more in a week long training event then in semesters of college classes. I'm a better man then I was when I got here and that's thanks to the motivation, prodding, smoking, teaching, and example of my team and squad leaders.

I wish I could have logged in during my training but I'm an idiot and couldn't remember my login info. I'm sure I missed some things I would have liked to say and if I think of them I'll update this post if I can.
RASP 7-13

RS 10-14

C co 2/75 Punishers

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Jim
Rest In Peace Ranger
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Jim »

PAhunter21, Superb SITREP. You have learned well. As you progress in your unit. Please feel free to add to your thread. I am proud of your accomplishments, and I envy your youth. Never, never quit!
Ranger Class 13-71
Advisor, VN 66-68 69-70
42d Vn Ranger Battalion 1969-1970
Trainer, El Salvador 86-87
Advisor, Saudi Arabian National Guard 91, 93-94
75th RRA Life Member #867

ZoneIV
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by ZoneIV »

Jim wrote:PAhunter21, Superb SITREP. ..........I envy your youth. Never, never quit!
X2
RS Class 8-83
US Army 82-89

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PocketKings
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by PocketKings »

Might be the best overall SITREP I've seen in a while. Keep on keeping on!
RS 01-00
82d (1-325 AIR) 99-00
101st (2-502d IN) 00-03

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Slowpoke
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Slowpoke »

PocketKings wrote:Might be the best overall SITREP I've seen in a while. Keep on keeping on!
GREAT sitrep young Ranger!
I never wore a cape, but I still have my dog tags.

Experienced Peek Freak!!

173rd Abn LRRP...'66/'67
C/1/506 101st Abn
B/2/325 82nd Abn

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CharlieRanger1FFV
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by CharlieRanger1FFV »

Ditto . . .great job, Ranger!


RLTW!!!
Silencium Mortium

B /1/504 82nd Abn 69 - 70
C co (Ranger) 75th (Abn) Inf, II Corps Rangers, 70 - 71 Viet Nam
12th SFG (A) 76 - 78
75th Ranger Regiment Association, Lifetime Member # 2776

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PAhunter21
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by PAhunter21 »

I keep rediscovering this site after being away for too long and I'm always kicking myself cuz there's some good shit on here. Well, I figured I'd add to my thread on here since i recently graduated from Ranger School. Felt good to be done with that since it's something hanging over every Ranger privates head from the time he shows up to Batt. Graduated with class 10-14...not the class I started with but who's keeping track? Not too much to say about it really. I learned a lot and I'm glad I did it...and I'm glad I'll never do it again. Hope things are going well for ya Rangers. Have a good one fellas.
RASP 7-13

RS 10-14

C co 2/75 Punishers

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Slowpoke
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Slowpoke »

You've done well young Warrior, congratulations. It was good to read you're update, keep them coming when you can.
I never wore a cape, but I still have my dog tags.

Experienced Peek Freak!!

173rd Abn LRRP...'66/'67
C/1/506 101st Abn
B/2/325 82nd Abn

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rangerjd
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by rangerjd »

Great SITREP and great job Ranger. Nice to see some young C Co Rangers on here. It was an honor to get to meet some of you C Co Rangers at the anniversary last month. A bunch of us Rangers from 1st Plt C Co, 70s through the 80s are having a reunion next July, 2015. Hope to be able to meet you, if possible. Keep us informed of how you're doing. Reading these updates help keep us old Rangers young. :) RLTW
Ranger Class 8-82
C Co 2/75 80-83-HCMTC 83-85
Drill Sgt 85-87-Sapper Instructor 87-89
A Co 2/75 89-90-G3 I Corps 90-91
I Corps LRSC 91-93-7th RTB RI 94-95
Retired 95
"I'd rather spend 10 seconds in the saddle, than a life time of watching from the stands." Chris Ledoux

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CharlieRanger1FFV
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by CharlieRanger1FFV »

Great SitRep, Ranger. . . thank you for your post & your service.


RLTW!!!
Silencium Mortium

B /1/504 82nd Abn 69 - 70
C co (Ranger) 75th (Abn) Inf, II Corps Rangers, 70 - 71 Viet Nam
12th SFG (A) 76 - 78
75th Ranger Regiment Association, Lifetime Member # 2776

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Jim
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Jim »

Good SITREP, please give us more details. Have you earned a CIB?
Ranger Class 13-71
Advisor, VN 66-68 69-70
42d Vn Ranger Battalion 1969-1970
Trainer, El Salvador 86-87
Advisor, Saudi Arabian National Guard 91, 93-94
75th RRA Life Member #867

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PAhunter21
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by PAhunter21 »

RangerJim, I have not earned a CIB. The only combat deployment I've been on so far was pretty slow. It's the biggest regret I have in my military career so far. I know it's out of my control but it's hard not to feel like I'm kind of a fake until I get it. It is what it is though I guess all I can do is my job and hope I get my chance.
RASP 7-13

RS 10-14

C co 2/75 Punishers

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Jim
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Jim »

PAhunter21 wrote:RangerJim, I have not earned a CIB. The only combat deployment I've been on so far was pretty slow. It's the biggest regret I have in my military career so far. I know it's out of my control but it's hard not to feel like I'm kind of a fake until I get it. It is what it is though I guess all I can do is my job and hope I get my chance.
I want you to know how proud I am for what you have accomplished. You earned your tab. You have served with the finest unit in the
Army. Others dream of what you have done. Never, never quit!
Ranger Class 13-71
Advisor, VN 66-68 69-70
42d Vn Ranger Battalion 1969-1970
Trainer, El Salvador 86-87
Advisor, Saudi Arabian National Guard 91, 93-94
75th RRA Life Member #867

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Sleepy Doc
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Sleepy Doc »

Do not for one second discount what you have accomplished thus far. You, brother, have done more in your short time there than most do 20!.. Especially now that you have your Tab. I, for one, didn't really mind not getting the Tab. As a medic, I could take it, or leave it. It was more so that we could speak the language of they guys we would be working beside, and a little bragging rights. ("see? I could do your school too.." ) SOMC had more to do with my actual job, and that was one I would have liked. (that, and mebbe Jumpmaster..)

However, as I'm sure you have noticed, for the infantry guys YOU MUST get a Tab for good things to happen in Batt. (schools, promotions, etc. ) Without it, you are nothing. I'm sure you have seen more than a few guys who were total shitbags, and when they get their Ranger Tab? POOF! Suddnely, they are in the cool-guy club. Believe me, I get it that the school has untold benefits. A lot of guys are coming back from deployments and asking "I have stereo scrolls/patches and a CIB. Why do I need to go to Ranger school?.." I could try and tell you why it is relevant, but this essay from SOFREP does a far better job than I can.

http://sofrep.com/1359/so-who-wants-to- ... er-school/

So you didn't get yer CIB? Stick around long enough and you will. I know a handful of dudes that made it to Somalia late and got stereo scrolls, but no CIB. This might not actually be a bad thing. I met a man who was a medic in the 29th Infantry Div. on D-Day, and he made it through the entire war without so much as a sprained ankle. Can you believe that?? By the time you are done with your tenure in Batt., you will have shot more, blown up more shit, rucked more miles, traveled to more locations, and generally done more shit than most do in an entire career.

Most importantly, you will have done it with men who want to be where they are, and THAT makes ALL the difference. If you ever get assigned to another unit, you will see what I mean.

You have done a yeoman's job getting to where you are. Jim is 100% right when he says others dream of making it that far, brother!

RLTW!
B Co 3/75 '95-'99
4th RTB '00-'01

"ahh, Daniel-san.. When balance good, Karate good...everything good!.." K. Miyagi

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Jim
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Re: Long overdue SITREP

Post by Jim »

Please feel free to update anytime.
Ranger Class 13-71
Advisor, VN 66-68 69-70
42d Vn Ranger Battalion 1969-1970
Trainer, El Salvador 86-87
Advisor, Saudi Arabian National Guard 91, 93-94
75th RRA Life Member #867

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