SUSTAINED AIRBORNE TRAINING.

Ground Week, Tower Week, Jump Week.
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hit_it
Paratrooper
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Joined: November 6th, 2003, 8:04 pm
Location: 800' AGL on the AJ door

SUSTAINED AIRBORNE TRAINING.

Post by hit_it »

Since there's not much here on training for Jumps, I'll add some thing that may be pertinent.



1. The Five Points of Performance:

a. The first thing I’ll discuss are the five points of performance. The first point of performance is "PROPER EXIT, CHECK BODY POSITION, AND COUNT." Keep your eyes open, chin on your chest, elbows tight into your sides, hands over the ends of your reserve parachute with your fingers spread. Bend slightly forward at the waist. Keep your feet and knees together with your knees locked to the rear. Count to four thousand. At the end of your four thousand count, if you feel no opening shock, immediately activate your reserve parachute for a complete malfunction.

b. The second point of performance is "CHECK CANOPY AND IMMEDIATELY GAIN CANOPY CONTROL." To gain canopy control of the MC1-1C parachute, you will reach up and secure both toggles and pull them down to eye level, simultaneously making a 360 degree check of your canopy. To gain canopy control of the T-10C parachute, reach up and secure all four risers and simultaneously make a 360 degree check of your canopy.

c. You will then go into the third point of performance, which is, "KEEP A SHARP LOOKOUT FOR ALL JUMPERS DURING YOUR ENTIRE DESCENT." Remember the three rules of the air: Always look before you turn, always turn right to avoid collisions and the lower jumper has the right of way. Avoid all jumpers all the way to the ground. Maintain at least a fifty foot separation. At the end of your third point of performance, release all appropriate equipment tie downs.

d. The fourth point of performance is "SLIP/TURN INTO THE WIND AND PREPARE TO LAND." At 200 feet above ground level you will look below you to ensure there are no fellow jumpers and then lower your equipment. When jumping the MC1-1C parachute, you will turn into the wind at approximately 200 feet above ground level. If the wind is blowing from your right to your left, you will pull down on your right toggle and lock your elbow. Once you are facing into the wind let up slowly to prevent oscillation. If the wind is blowing from your left to your right, you will pull down on your left toggle and lock your elbow. Once you are facing into the wind let up slowly to prevent oscillation. If the wind is blowing from your rear to your front, you will pull down on either toggle and lock your elbow. Once you are facing into the wind let up slowly to prevent oscillation. If the wind is blowing from your front to your rear, you will make minor corrections to remain facing into the wind. When jumping the T-10C parachute, you will slip into the wind at approximately 100 feet above ground level. If the wind is blowing from your left to your right, you will reach up high on your left risers and pull them down into your chest and hold them until you land. If the wind is blowing from your right to your left, you will reach up high on your right risers and pull them down into your chest and hold them until you land. If the wind is blowing from your rear to your front, you will reach up high on your rear risers and pull them down into your chest and hold them until you land. If the wind is blowing from your front to your rear, you will reach up high on your front risers and pull them down into your chest and hold them until you land. After you have slipped or turned into the wind, you will assume a prepare to land attitude by keeping your feet and knees together, knees slightly bent, elbows tight into your sides, chin on chest and your eyes open.

e. The fifth point of performance is "LAND." Make a parachute landing fall by hitting all five points of contact: balls of feet, calf, thigh, buttocks and the push-up muscle. Never make a standing landing. Remain on the ground and activate one of the canopy release assemblies by using one of the two methods of recovery from the drag. They are the "Hand to Shoulder Method" and the "Hand Assist Method." The "Hand Assist Method" being the most preferred. With the thumb and index finger of one hand, pull out and down on the safety clip. Form a fist with the thumb exposed and then insert your thumb into the cable loop. Turn your head in the opposite direction. Then assisting with the other hand, pull out and down on the cable loop, simultaneously sounding off with "Riser." At this time you will place your weapon into operation and remove the parachute harness.

2. Recovery and Turn-in of Equipment. Once you are out of the parachute harness, remove all air items from the D-rings. Unsnap and unzip the aviator’s kit bag and roll it two thirds of the way down. Place the parachute harness inside the aviator’s kit bag, with the smooth side facing up, leaving the waistband exposed. Recover the riser you just released and place it under the parachute harness. Elongate the suspension lines and canopy, removing all debris. Once you reach the apex of the canopy, insert your thumb into the bridle loop and figure eight roll your canopy and suspension lines all the way to the aviator’s kit bag. Place the canopy and suspension lines in the aviator’s kit bag leaving 6 – 8 inches of canopy exposed, to include the bridle loop. Then snap, do not zip, the aviator’s kit bag. You will then secure all equipment, conduct a 360 degree check of your area, locate the nearest turn-in point, and move out to it.

3. Malfunctions. There are two types of malfunctions, a complete malfunction and a partial malfunction. A complete malfunction provides you no lift capability, therefore you must activate your reserve parachute. There are several types of partial malfunctions and actions for each. If you have a semi-inversion, squid, cigarette roll or a complete inversion with damage to the canopy or suspension lines, you must activate your reserve parachute. If you have a complete inversion with no damage to the canopy or suspension lines, do not activate your reserve parachute. If you have damaged suspension lines, blown section or gore, you must compare your rate of descent with your fellow jumpers. If you are falling faster than your fellow jumpers, you will activate your reserve parachute. If you are not falling faster, maintain what you have.

4. Activation of the Reserve Parachute. To activate your reserve parachute for a malfunction, you will utilize the "Pull Drop Method." Maintain a good tight body position. Grasp the left carrying handle with your left hand; with your right hand, grasp the rip cord grip. Turn your head in either direction. Pull out on the rip cord grip and drop it. Your reserve parachute will activate.

5. Towed Parachutist.

a. If you become a towed parachutist, and you are being towed by your static line, and you are unconscious, you will be retrieved back inside the aircraft. If you are conscious, maintain a good tight body position. Place your right hand over the rip cord protector flap with your right forearm protecting the rip cord grip. An attempt will be made to retrieve you. If you cannot be retrieved, your static line will be cut. As soon as you feel yourself falling free from the aircraft, activate your reserve parachute utilizing the Pull Drop Method.

b. If you become a towed parachutist and you are being towed by your equipment, whether you are conscious or unconscious, that item of equipment will be cut immediately and your main parachute will deploy.

6. Entanglements. There are two types of entanglements: High altitude and mid altitude.

a. If you see you are going to become entangled with another jumper, immediately attempt to slip or turn away. If you cannot slip or turn away, immediately assume a spread eagle position and try to bounce off the fellow jumper’s canopy or suspension lines. If you do become entangled, snap into a modified position of attention. Place your right hand over the rip cord protector flap, with your right forearm protecting the rip cord grip. With your left hand, attempt to weave your way out of the suspension lines the same way you entered.

b. If you become hopelessly entangled, and you are jumping the T-10C main parachute, the higher jumper will use the hand under hand method to climb down to the lower jumper. Once they are even, both jumpers will grasp each other’s main lift web and decide what type of parachute landing fall they will make. Both jumpers will fall in the same direction. You will not do a front parachute landing fall. Both jumpers will observe both canopies. If one canopy collapses, both jumpers will ride the one good canopy to the ground. One T-10C parachute can sustain both jumpers. If both canopies collapse, both jumpers will immediately push or turn away, creating a clear unobstructed path, and then activate their reserve parachute utilizing the Pull Drop Method.

c. If you are jumping the MC1-1C parachute, and you become hopelessly entangled, both jumpers will stay where they are, ensure they have a clear unobstructed path, then immediately activate their reserve parachute utilizing the Pull Drop Method.

7. Emergency Landings.

There are three types of emergency landings: Tree Landing, Wire Landing and Water Landing. The first one I’ll discuss is the Tree Landing.

a. If you see yourself drifting towards a body of trees, immediately try to slip or turn away. If you cannot slip or turn away and your equipment has already been lowered, look below you to ensure there are no fellow jumpers below you and jettison your equipment, making a mental note of where it lands. If your equipment has not already been lowered, keep it on you to provide additional protection as you pass through the trees. Assume a good prepare to land attitude by keeping your feet and knees together, knees slightly bent, chin on chest, eyes open, and your hands in front of your face with your elbows high. Be prepared to do a PLF in the event you pass through the trees. If you get hung up in the trees and you do not feel you can safely lower yourself to the ground, stay where you are and wait for assistance. If you decide to climb down, jettison all unneeded equipment. Ensure that you maintain your ballistic helmet. Activate the quick release in the waistband then activate the chest strap ejector snap. Place your left hand over the rip cord protector flap and apply slight pressure. Ensure you have a clear unobstructed path then activate the reserve parachute and lower it to the ground. Undo the left connector snap and rotate the reserve parachute to the right. Seat yourself well into the saddle. Activate the leg strap ejector snaps and climb down the outside of the reserve parachute. When in doubt, stay where you are and wait for assistance.

b. Wire Landing. If you are drifting towards wires, immediately try to slip or turn away. If you cannot slip or turn away, look below you to ensure there are no fellow jumpers below you and jettison your equipment, making a mental note of where it lands. Assume a prepare to land attitude by keeping your feet and knees together, exaggerating the bend in your knees, eyes open, chin on chest, and arch your back. Place the palms of your hands high on the inside of the front set of risers. When you make contact with the wires, begin a hard rocking motion and attempt to pass through the wires. Be prepared to do a PLF in the event you pass through the wires. If you get hung up in the wires, do not attempt to lower yourself to the ground. Stay where you are and wait for assistance.

c. Water Landing. If you are drifting towards a body of water, immediately try to slip or turn away. If you cannot slip or turn away, look below you to ensure there are no fellow jumpers below you, and lower your equipment. You will also jettison your ballistic helmet, making a mental note of where it lands. Activate the quick release in your waistband, unsnap the left connector snap and rotate the reserve parachute to the right. Activate the chest strap ejector snap and immediately regain canopy control. Prior to entering the water, assume a prepare to land attitude by keeping your feet and knees together, knees slightly bent, eyes open, chin on chest, and both hands on the leg strap ejector snaps. Upon making contact with the water, activate the leg strap ejector snaps, then throw your arms up and attempt to slide out of the parachute harness. Once in the water, you will swim upstream or upwind away from the canopy. Be prepared to do a PLF in the event the water is shallow.

8. B-7 Life Preserver. When jumping the B-7 life preserver, you will activate the B-7 life preserver while still in the air. You will not jettison any of your equipment. Look below you to ensure there are no fellow jumpers below you and lower your equipment. Assume a prepare to land attitude and be prepared to do a PLF in the event the water is shallow. Once in the water, activate one canopy release assembly by using one of the two methods of recovery from the drag previously described.

9. Night Jump. When jumping at night, always give your canopy an extra look. Maintain noise discipline and a good interval between fellow jumpers. Be prepared to do a PLF because you will hit the ground approximately 5 to 10 seconds before you think you will.

10. AWADS. When jumping under AWADS conditions, do not lower your equipment until you have cleared through the clouds. Do not slip or turn unless you have to do so to avoid a collision. If you have any kind of malfunction, immediately activate your reserve parachute because you cannot compare your rate of descent with that of fellow jumpers.

11. Parachute Landing Falls. At this time we will move to the parachute landing fall platform and execute one satisfactory parachute landing fall in each of the four directions. Remember to expose the lower three points of contact for the modified parachute landing fall.
MSG Hit_it

@Bragg

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