Personal Recommendation for a Martial Art

Hand to Hand, Combative Skills, etc...
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Too Long
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Personal Recommendation for a Martial Art

Post by Too Long »

Rangers,

I have some free time and am looking into taking up a martial art as a new hobby. I'm looking for something applicable. Unfortunately I also live in a small state and so my options are limited to the more mainstream choices. Do any of you have any personal recommendations for a martial art? I live in Maine if its of any help as to recommending a school. I'm looking for something that will help with physical fitness, mental clarity, and applicability in hand to hand scenarios.

Thanks for any advice in advance.

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Post by EvilCouch »

I've been a fan of jujitsu ever since Matt Larsen trashed me with it in RIP. It's gotten popular enough that there should be schools pretty much everywhere.

Just be aware that since it's very popular that there's a fair amount of instructors out there that are going to inflate their resumes a bit. If someone's wearing a black belt at the dojo you're looking at and they haven't been doing it for around 20 years or more, be very wary.
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Post by Chiron »

I like Aikido but also think Tiger Claw Kung Fu is good. The thing you should look for is the art that will suit your style. If you have to force yourself to do something just out of necessity then it’s not your “cup of teaâ€
Last edited by Chiron on April 18th, 2008, 12:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Earthpig »

These days, I feel like MMA is the way to go. Our core styles are Shotokan and Gojo Ryu, but we use Jujitsu, Aikido, Judo, and several other styles. It gives you a more well-rounded approach. Besides, depending on your frame and agility, not every style or every technique will work good for everyone. This way, you can tailor a style to your own body and abilities.

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Post by Rangerguru »

Don't limit yourself to just one system. The most recent one that I have trained is Krav Maga. It's developed in Isreal and in my personal experience, it's the best one that I have found as far as an actual application to what one might use in a combat situation.
Just as what Evil Couch said, there are alot of instructors out there that will inflate their resumes.
The only school in the US that is recognized by the Krav Maga Association of America is in Los Angles, but with that being said, there are good instructors out there and if you decide that it is for you, simply check to see where they got their instructor certification from.
If you want to look into it more, the website is www.KRAVMAGA.com
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Post by Slowpoke »

Kashot Gun is very effective, although Tai Kwan Bar Stool can come in very handy.
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Post by Sleepy Doc »

I never would have thought you could use it for defense, But I saw a little elderly chinese lady fuck up a much larger dude in a Tai Chi demo. (of course she had been practicing some 50 odd years...)
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Post by Creeping Death »

Rangerguru wrote:Don't limit yourself to just one system. The most recent one that I have trained is Krav Maga. It's developed in Isreal and in my personal experience, it's the best one that I have found as far as an actual application to what one might use in a combat situation.
Just as what Evil Couch said, there are alot of instructors out there that will inflate their resumes.
The only school in the US that is recognized by the Krav Maga Association of America is in Los Angles, but with that being said, there are good instructors out there and if you decide that it is for you, simply check to see where they got their instructor certification from.
If you want to look into it more, the website is www.KRAVMAGA.com
I will second Krav Maga. I stopped actively studying Krav when my kids came around, but at that time my school was the first and only school authorized in the state to teach it. Our instructors had to go the the main school referenced by above in LA, after they made a very sizeable non-refundable application fee and showed the appropriate background and skill set.

When it came time for us to test out to the next level, the Krav Assoc sent an instructor from Israel to grade us, and if the class as a whole didn't pass a certain percentage based on his evaluation standards, then our instuctor lost his license to teach Krav. Period. End of discussion. And this was at a well established martial arts school with an instructor with over 20 yrs experience in teaching martial arts. I've seen more than one black belt in other styles fail Krav Level I tests. They don't play games and they don't compromise their standards.

For street application, I am a big fan of Krav Maga. No fluff. No spirituality ying yang shintoism for years until you "get it". Just down and dirty easy to learn, easy to recall techniques that stress no wasted movement, high brutality, and high levels of violence of action. Close with and destroy as soon as possible.
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Too Long
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Post by Too Long »

Rangers,

Thank you for your responses. I have looked into Krav Maga before due to its reputation, but unfortunately the closest school is a few states away. There are two aikido schools in my state and I have been looking at them for a little while now. Do any of you have any personal experience with aikido?

I will keep all of your advice in mind in the future when I move to a larger state with more options. I don't plan on limiting myself to one martial art in my life and already think that there is something to be said for the +1 rule of fighting.

thanks again,

Too Long.

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Post by Chiron »

A SGT in our plattoon was very good with Aikido. He asked me to try and hit him as hard and as best I could. Couldn't touch him! I picked up some things but I have no belt nonethless I would say it works wonders. :wink:
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Too Long
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Post by Too Long »

Ranger Chiron,

Thanks for sharing your experience. I've decided now that I will take aikido. Now I'll have to sit in on some classes and decide which dojo to join.

-Too Long

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Post by PocketKings »

My CO (when I was an XO) did akido and had his sensei come to teach a few things for PT to our Company. I enjoyed it and learned some good takeaway stuff. I wasn't too into the wrist/hand stuff because I prefer larger muscle movements. Hence, we would follow his lesson with our own jacked up version of MMA. Basically, boxing gloves, head pro, and go at it for 3x2 min bouts.

We also had a kid from Israel in my BN that knew basic Krav Magna. I was VERY impressed with the few short lessons he taught. That is a no-nonsense method of fighting.

The only other 'formal' training I've had (and can recommend) is the Dieter Acadamy in MD/VA. He's got SEAL guys who train other SEAL guys. The 101st sent a bunch of us to a course. It was pretty good, but much more 'bar/street/combat' fighting than traditional martial arts. The strikes were all geared towards dropping someone quick and flex cuffing them or killing them, period. I wouldn't think of using that stuff unless I was a) a cop on duty, b) on military deployment, or c) seriously thinking my life was in danger.

If you can get even 2 weeks to do that guys course it would be a good experience. The 'hood room' especially.
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Post by TC204 »

Uechi-ryu is a great aggressive form.

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Post by Equalizer »

All martial arts are great in thier own perspective. I've done Muay Thai/Boxing/Savate =6 years, Jeet Kune Do = 3 years, Wing Chun =3 years and Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu (Ninjutsu) = 4 years. Of all these wonderful styles and arts many things can be taken, it's up to you to take from. But know this, just like in the military, it's all about who teaches it. I can't or should I say wont :lol: learn how to clear a room, check my points, or what the velocity of a 240 is from a Jag man, nor can you or should you learn to defend yourself from a man who's never had to defend himself (succesfully anyway). My best advice; find an art that you gravitate to, whatever that reason may be and go view a class, if they don't spar, I mean spar good and hard, it aint gonna help you when you need it. Now of course you'll ask the Teacher/Sifu/Soke/Sensei/Master if they spar they'll probably respond with either "yes we do light sparring", or "no we dont spar because our art is to dangerous" THIS SHOULD BE A HUGE RED FLAG OF BOGOUS !!!! Then that is considered an art NOT I repeat NOT defense. Which defense is ultimatly what you're looking for. Find someone who says something like " yes, you'll start out after learning the basics with light sparring, then as you advance so will the intencity of the sparring". Then ask to view an advanced class to see what you'll be doing. Every art I go to to view I attened the advanced class. Just my 1/2 a cent. Hope it hepls. I'v been doing this a long time PM me if you have any questions about a particular school, I can try to do some verification work on it for you ! 8)
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Post by Equalizer »

Bottom line, you know the saying " we fight how we train". That's all you need to know when you look into a school. If thier doing a bunch of choreographed (man that's a big word :shock: ) moves well then you should be able per the montra "we fight how we train" and see thier just "dances" looking pretty.
Somewhere someone is training to kill you. He trains with minimal food and water, in austere conditions. The only thing clean on him is his weapon, and he made his gear. His ruck weighs what it weighs, his runs end when you stop chasing him. He is not concerned about how hard it is he knows either he wins, or dies. He doesn't go home, he is home.

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